Parsnip

Parsnips (Pastinaca sativa)
 

Parsnips are native to Europe and western Asia. They have been cultivated for their yellowish, carrot-shaped roots since the time of the ancient Greeks. Parsnips were introduced to North America at the beginning of the seventeenth century, and their use spread rapidly among Native Americans. Now, the vegetable gets as many quizzical looks as absolute raves. Their taste is best only after the frost, so we wait until the bitter end to harvest these. If you are unfamiliar with them, wash, peel them, steam them, and mash them for an amazingly sweet, distinctive taste. Parsnips are rich in vitamin C.

If you are unfamiliar with them, wash them, peel them, steam them, and mash them for an amazingly sweet, distinctive taste.

Storage Tips:

 

  • Trim off parnsips tops and refrigerate unwashed in a plastic bag for up to two weeks.
  • For longer term storage, bury in moist sand and keep in a very cool but not freezing location.
  • Parsnips may be frozen. Blanch 1" chuncks for 2-3 minutes. Run under cold water. Drain and pack into airtight containers. Parnisp puree freezes well also.